1839 map of Texas

1839 map of Texas

7229 x 8777

‘this is amazing.

having a lot of trouble finding modern borders though. it looks like the southern and eastern borders are mostly the same, right?

where is el paso?

The southern border stops at the Rio Bravo which was apparently what the Rio Grande was called back then, so yes east, southern, and gulf coast borders are mostly the same.

El Paso isn’t on this map, it doesn’t extend far enough to the west (also El Paso didn’t become part of Texas till around 1846)’

1847 map of Australasia - by William Hughes

1847 map of Australasia - by William Hughes

3042 x 2508

‘Am I seeing wrong or is Victoria labelled “Felix”???

Australia Felix (Latin for “fortunate Australia” or “happy Australia”) was an early name given by Thomas Mitchell to lush pasture in parts of western Victoria he explored in 1836 on his third expedition. On this expedition Mitchell was instructed to travel to Menindee, then down the Darling River to the sea, if it flowed there; or, if it flowed into the Murray River to go up the Murray to the inhabited parts of the colony. However lack of water forced Mitchell to follow the Lachlan River to the south-west as the only practicable route. He reached the Murrumbidgee on 12 May and followed it to the Murray’

1875 map of the Pacific - by Adolf Steiler

1875 map of the Pacific - by Adolf Steiler

9517 x 4597

‘Love Pacific maps. They’re just about the only area of the world where I still always learn something new. Particularly like how this one has highlighted different archipelagos/territories. Makes them easier to remember. Also I didn’t realise the pack ice went that far north in 1875! So close to Tierra del Feugo and encircling Macquarie Island!’

1857 map of Kansas

1857 map of Kansas

6130 x 6158

‘Squares inside of a square

It’s almost like farming works best in a square, to maximize effective space and construction of roads and fences

You’ve obviously not been in the eastern part of Kansas: it includes the Flint Hills, and the Osage cuesta ecoregion, especially the northern sections, are anything but flat. Triangles, circles, and other geometric shapes are harder to construct without there being leftover space, and let’s face it: land was money even back then. The decision to lay out the grids were simply a convenience to the surveying technologies of the day that made it much easier to lay out straight lines rather than follow the contours of the land, which probably would have made more sense as far as long term land management practices….’

1819 map of Asia and Oceania

1819 map of Asia and Oceania

6157 x 5388

‘Interesting it’s still referred to as New Holland with ongoing British colonisation

No. Perth, in Western Australia, was not founded until 10 years after this map, by the British. Also Adelaide in South Australia, and even Melbourne in Eastern Australia.

The east coast of Australia–unmapped by the Dutch–was mapped by James Cook in 1770 and thus known as New South Wales. Sydney was established in 1788. So it’s correct that the other three coasts of Australia were still known as New Holland.

It’s a lesson in how things can be named but not recognised as belonging to a particular power until they are colonised, since actual use of the land supposes an entitlement to it.

The Dutch were great explorers and commercial agents but since they found no commercial use in Australia they didn’t have any need to assert a claim to their discoveries.

Australia is a fascinating lesson in this aspect. The same applies to New Zealand which the Dutch discovered 127 years before Cook fully mapped it on his way to Australia. If the Dutch had behaved differently they would have exerted more influence’