1895 map of Denmark and its territories

1895 map of Denmark and its territories

8614 x 7340

‘There is something about these maps that… I dont know, just make them better looking then what we have today. So classy and stuff. Anyway, interesting to see how Denmark saw itself in those days. And weird seeing Iceland as a “territory” i know it was one, but seeing it in history is kinda weird, to used to see it as a independent country’–NobleAzorean

1893 birds-eye view of the Great Salt Lake Basin, and the upper Columbia (Snake and Clark Fork) and upper Missouri drainages

1893 birds-eye view of the Great Salt Lake Basin, and the upper Columbia (Snake and Clark Fork) and upper Missouri drainages

4267 x 9148

‘So the railroad basically followed the course to Montana that I-15 now traverses. It’s fun to think about what it would have been like to take the “Road to Yellowstone National Park” from the RR station at China Point. The map makes it look like a nearly straight and flat trail into the park. But some details on the map don’t add up: either the road actually started at Monida staying North of the mountains then via Raynolds Pass, or it cut through some steep and winding mountains to get up there from China Point, or it actually stayed to the south of that range, crossing the divide at Targhee Pass. 15 years later, you could just take the Oregon Short Line railroad from Idaho Falls up Henry’s Fork to West Yellowstone. That route is now accessible only by non-motorized means’–lightsuitman

1820 map of Asia - by Annin & Smith

1820 map of Asia - by Annin & Smith

7455 x 6168

‘This is a really sensible Europe-Asia division, I must say. I don’t understand why is Bashkiria with its Central Asian affiliations supposed to be in Europe. Nor the historical Pontic-Caspian steppe inhabited by Turkic nomads with an unclear difference from e.g. Kazakh nomads. Just because those lands got settled by a European power and the previous population got removed doesn’t make them European, at least not unless you think East Thrace became West Asian when settled by the Turks’–Humanophage

Movement of the travellers transported via the French railroads in 1891 (published 1893)

Movement of the travellers transported via the French railroads in 1891 (published 1893)

7484 × 9596

‘Someone may want to correct me, as I don’t speak French, but –

The width of the bands colored in purple represent on the scale of 1 millimeter per 100,000 passengers, the movement of travelers transported on each line section in both directions, that is to say the average number reduced to the total length of this line or this section.

The numbers of travelers attached to each line have been expressed in thousands with a single decimal for the hundreds’–AJgloe